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The Student News Site of Cape Coral High School

The Seahawk's Eye

The Student News Site of Cape Coral High School

The Seahawk's Eye

Trick-or-treating never gets old

Trick-or-treating is a tradition associated with most popular holidays celebrated across the globe, Halloween. To younger kids, Halloween means staying up past their bedtimes dressed up in costumes, wandering the streets and competing with their friends to see who can collect the most candy.

In the past few years, another version of the traditional trick-or-treating has been invented that has changed Halloween for the worst: trunk-or-treating. However, trick-or-treating simply can’t be beat by its modern day alternative.

Trunk-or-treating was originally meant to be a Christian tradition in the late 1990s when churches wanted a less “evil” or “scary” version of trick-or-treating. Instead of going door to door to collect candy, you’d visit different car trunks which are accessorized with Halloween decorations and little party games. This version made its way to the public, and has gained popularity over the years because of its “simplicity.”

Some parents regard it as a safer alternative to trick-or-treating, while others view it as an easier way of walking the neighborhood with their children. While it may do its job as a safer and less spooky substitute, it completely drains Halloween of the fun we’ve grown to know and love for years. 

What if there aren’t many people volunteering their cars for this event? Kids will leave disappointed with the low amount of candy they collected. 

Halloween is known for its spookiness. People have horror movie marathons in celebration of the holiday. The whole holiday is about kids dressing up and walking around the neighborhood. 

With Halloween closing off the month, October has been labeled the “spookiest month of the year.” Taking away the “spookiness” would be like taking away the music away from Christmas or the egg hunts from Easter.

The reasoning behind trunk-or-treating seems somewhat pointless. Nothing about going around collecting candy holds evil connotations. If this is what people are worried about, then maybe parents should take their kids out of school. Some elementary schools host Halloween parties where kids could have the chance to dress up and eat snacks and candy during school hours. 

Yes, trick-or-treating can be dangerous at times, however, as long as children stay with their parents or guardians, then everyone should be fine. The same dangers that parents are concerned about with trick-or-treating, can be applied to trunk-or-treating. What’s stopping some random creep from snatching a kid and throwing them in a trunk? 

Admittedly, trunk-or-treating does have some appealing aspects to go alone with it. As you’re collecting candy, you get to look at impressively decorated car trunks and and play the seasonal attractions inside of them. Although while trunk-or-treating has party games and cool decorations, there are some neighborhoods that have been known to make even greater haunted houses or sell drinks and snacks for the eventful night.

Trunk-or-treating generally isn’t a bad idea. It’s just that the thought of it fully replacing traditions doesn’t sound reasonable. 

The fun that comes with trick-or-treating should not be taken away from the younger generations. Children should be able to go door to door and yell “trick or treat!” Trick-or-treating will forever be an iconic tradition for Halloween, and trunk-or-treating won’t change that. 

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Jonathan Hood, Staff Writer
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